player tips

20

February

You Have To Believe To Achieve

Posted by Greg Carter
Greg Carter Hockey School

When I evaluate hockey talent there are many skill-based considerations including the obvious stickhandling, shooting and skating.  There are also the intangibles including work ethic, coachability, hockey smarts and confidence.

Oftentimes the fine line in separating talent comes down to confidence, not only individually, but also as a team. With confidence comes poise and composure, and the ability to perform on the biggest stage under the most pressure. You have heard players and teams described as having ‘ice in their veins’. This characterization is earned, through experience and perseverance.

At a recent game a team was down 3-2 and with their goalie pulled and their ‘go-to’ players on the ice, they tactically moved the puck around the offensive zone with precision. They didn’t force anything, but instead waited for just the right opportunity to put the puck on net in the hopes of tying the game.

With the clock running down the final few seconds, the top scorer wound up with the puck and just like that, the game was tied. Less than 30 seconds into overtime that same team scored the game winner. Sure, this included a little puck luck, but it was clear to everyone in the building, including the opposition, that this team believed without a doubt that they would tie the game. The players on the ice believed wholeheartedly that they were destined to tie, and ultimately win the game.

Not only did the team have the confidence, but individually, the players knew that they had the skill and the will to win. The players knew that all of the hard work and practice time spent shooting extra pucks, working on powerskating, stickhandling and shooting was going to pay off. They absolutely believed that they could achieve.

As the playoffs approach do you believe that you will achieve? Both individually and as a team? And once that final buzzer sounds signaling the end of the season, do you believe that you can set goals, work hard this summer and hit the ice next season as a bigger, stronger, more skilled hockey player?

We invite you to take your game to the next level at one of our hockey schools located in 12 states this summer.  We know that with some great instruction, hard work and dedication, we can help make you a believer, and an achiever!

Thanks for reading and good luck the rest of your season!

 

 

Greg Carter Hockey Camp

This summer hockey players will take a break from the warm sun and blue skies to work on their game and goals to become a better hockey player. How? Here in our home state of Massachusetts we are proud of Tom Brady’s sixth Super Bowl, and therefore rather than the five reasons to register for a summer hockey school, we added a “Tom’s Take” and now offer you SIX super reasons to increase your skills at summer hockey school!

Become a better hockey player! An old coach used to say that ‘if we get better each and every day, we are going to be just fine both as a team, as well as individuals.’ We believe this to be true and carry that motto with us into all of our hockey camps. Our talented and knowledgeable instructors work hard to make sure that when the week of hockey school is over, players leave with more skill and a better appreciation and understanding of the game.

Meet new friends & learn from teammates. Attending a week-long hockey school is a great way to step out of your comfort zone a bit and meet new players from different areas of the state, or even the country! While every player at summer hockey school shares a love of the game, it’s very interesting to see some of the differences in styles of play from state to state. Players who attend summer hockey school have a unique opportunity to not only learn from our talented team of coaches, but often from other players who by the end of the week, become another hockey friend!

Specialized skill development. We pride ourselves at teaching the many fundamental skills needed to become a great hockey player and likewise, summer hockey camp is an excellent opportunity to work on the specific skills needed to take your game to the next level. Skating, shooting and passing are just a few of the areas we like to focus on. If you have a specific skill development need, our coaches love to talk about it at the start of the week!

Setting goals. Each summer we work with players to evaluate their game, determine areas of improvement and set goals to achieve something special. Great players all set goals for themselves and then constantly remind themselves of their goals and progress towards reaching them. If you come to summer hockey camp with clear goals, you are well on your way to success!

The CARTER Method. For 25 years we have been teaching hockey with the CARTER Method. We are very proud of the success that we have achieved and look forward to developing the next generation of hockey players with this time-tested method of development.

Become a champion! We all want to win, and here is some great perspective from six-time Super Bowl Champion Tom Brady:

“I was the kid that was the 199th pick that never had the body for it. People didn’t think I’d play one year in the NFL.”

This is a great reminder that hockey development is a marathon, not a sprint. It is also a testament to working hard, dedication and perseverance. You may not be on the first line today, but if you set goals and dedicate yourself to achieving them, anything is possible, even six Super Bowls!

Thank you for reading and we hope that you continue to follow your hockey dreams this summer at one of our hockey camps located in ten states!  For dates, locations and registration information, click here.

22

January

4 Keys To Earning More Playing Time

Posted by Greg Carter
Greg Carter's Hockey School

Sure, every player wants more playing time! However, wanting isn’t good enough, you need to earn playing time and here are four tips to work your way into more playing time.

1. The first priority for coaches is how you can contribute on the ice, and for the top players that determination is fairly easy. However, when it comes down to deciding line combinations and playing time amongst players of similar skills, coaches might rely on the player who shows up and does all of the extras. Things like off-ice training sessions, team activities and other team building events. The lesson here is go the extra mile both on and off of the ice

2. When you aren’t getting the ice time you want or thin you deserve, there are two directions you can go, and the best players know that attitude determines altitude. Coaches like players that are plugged in, listen and are coachable. Great coaches pride themselves on developing hockey players as much as they do in winning championships. If you are a coachable hockey player you stand a great chance of improving and earning that playing time!

3. There is no substitution for hard work. We have discussed this in recent articles and the bottom line is to earn more playing time you need to put in the effort. Most often the best players that you see in the games are also the best players in practice and the first ones onto the ice and the last ones to leave. As they say, the only time that success comes before work is in the dictionary!

4. Character counts. That’s right, as you progress through your youth hockey career and players start to separate themselves, character is something that is discusses among coaches. Players who are great teammates and have great character are always going to find a way to be successful. What you do on the ice can get you noticed, but how you carry yourself off of the ice can get you forgotten.

Thanks for reading and good luck as you head towards the final stretch of the season and into the playoffs! Please considering joining us this summer at one of our summer hockey schools located in ten states! For a complete listing and registration information click here.

 

 

 

 

 

Hockey Camp

The 2019 IIHF World Junior Championships just wrapped up in Vancouver, Canada. This tournament features the best hockey players under the age of 20. The action is intense, the speed is incredible, the passing is crisp and the overall talent out of this world!

So you might ask yourself, how do players take their game to the next level, and along with their team, rise to the occasion and take home a championship? How in ‘The Wolrd’s’ do they do it?

As witnessed at ‘The World’s’ in this tournament, here are the common characteristics of how players and teams win championships:

Bonding for a Common Goal: Teams are only as good as the players, and therefore the players need to all ‘buy-in’ to the process and systems to achieve the common goal of winning. Teams that are unable to bond and are instead comprised of a bunch of individuals skating for their own stats and recognition will most often not come out on top. To win, everyone needs to be a great teammate and always put the team first!

Selflessness: It’s always team first, ‘we’ over ‘me’. Individual stats and accomplishments come second. Fans saw this during the World Juniors when the Player of the Game was announced. It was evident in the humble reception of the individual award versus the overwhelming emotion to the team winning the game. Selfish players rarely win championships.

Talent & Teamwork: Talent wins hockey games, teamwork wins championships. This one is pretty obvious and can be seen at the local rink every week during every game. When a player has the opportunity to take a low percentage shot versus making a pass to a teammate for a better opportunity, what is the decision? As we have discussed in previous articles, it’s more important ‘that we do’ than ‘who’.

Winning Attitude: A great coach once said that ‘you have to believe you are a champion before you ever will be a champion’. While there is a ton of training, talent and hard work that factors into being a champion, a positive mindset and winning attitude definitely go a long way. Successful teams that I have played on have always believed that ‘we will win’ right up until the final buzzer. Do you believe?

From start to finish the World Junior hockey tournament was awesome. Although the U.S. Team came up a goal short and finished with the silver medal, it was must watch hockey TV. If you missed it, make sure to add it to your holiday calendar this year!

Thanks for reading and as always, we invite you to join us at one of our summer hockey camps in ten states this summer. 2019 is our 25th year of hockey camps and we are excited to celebrate it with you!

Click here for more information or to register!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hockey Camp

“Skate to where the puck is going, not where it has been.”

–Wayne Gretzky

For their gift this holiday season, kids aren’t going to the North Pole or flying a drone to intercept Santa’s Sleigh, instead they are headed to where the presents are going, under the tree! In the same way, players need to head to where the puck is going!

Watching kids play hockey, especially at the younger ages, it’s interesting and entertaining how they swarm around the puck and as a group, chase and follow it like it’s the town mayor handing out candy at the 4th of July parade. While coaches continually stress the importance of spreading out and playing position, it’s almost as if the puck is a magnetic force they are attracted to like, say, their cell phone or video game!

The ability to read the play in hockey is an extremely important skill as players progress through their development, and the best way to understand how to read and react is through experience. The time spent around the rink playing, practicing and even watching hockey on TV will help provide this experience.

The importance of understanding position play and the flow of the game looks natural to some players, but that intuition and ability to pick out tendencies is a learned behavior. I love driving by parks, ponds and driveways where kids are playing hockey in unstructured environments. Not only are they developing creativity and fundamental skills, but they are also mentally building an understanding of the natural flow of the game so that when it comes go game time, their instincts can take over.

Watching the best players at the top levels of the game, it’s not a coincidence that certain players always find themselves with time and space, and often, in breakaway situations. These players read, react, anticipate the play and as the Great One said, go not to where the puck is, but to where the puck is going.

We hope this holiday season that your player not only heads to where their gift is going, but learns over the course of the hockey season to go where the puck is going. Thanks for reading and we invite you to celebrate our 25th year of hockey camps in 2019! Dates, locations and registration information is now posted for our Greg Carter Hockey Schools located in 10 states across the U.S.!

 

 

 

 

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